Where is the happiest place in the World?
20th March 2017

Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Pin on Pinterest0Tweet about this on TwitterBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

To coincide with the International Day of Happiness, The United Nations have revealed their findings for the “World Happiness” report – a list of over 150 countries and how they’ve ranked in terms of happiness. The report measures “subjective well-being” and has been published for the last 5 years.

Once again, a selection of Nordic countries have dominated the top spots as they have done consistently since the start. However, Norway appears to have topped their Danish neighbours from the number one spot which they held last time.

Top 10 Happiest Countries
1. Norway
2. Denmark
3. Iceland
4. Switzerland
5. Finland
6. Netherlands
7. Canada
8. New Zealand
9. Australia
10. Sweden
Happiest place in the world - Norway

Norway – The happiest place in the world, apparently! (Image: Visit Norway)

As you can see, most of the top 10 are Western European countries, with the addition of Canada, New Zealand and Australia. The United States sits at 14, where the United Kingdom sits further down at 19. It’s the complete other end of the spectrum for sub-Saharan countries though, as well as places hit by conflict.

Top 10 Saddest Countries
146. Yemen
147. South Sudan
148. Liberia
149. Guinea
150. Togo
151. Rwanda
152. Syria
153. Tanzania
154. Burundi
155. Central African Republic
Central African Republic

The amount of conflict in the Central African Republic probably has a lot to do with its happiness state. (Image: RP)

Syria being ranked near the lowest possible position probably comes as no surprise with the events going on there currently. The same goes with Yemen and South Sudan, as they are both facing impending famine. The country that scored the lowest though is the Central African Republic.

The result relies on asking 1000 people from each country to rate their quality of life on a scale of 0 to 10, with 10 being the best possible life for them and 0 being the worst possible life. Using the data from this, each country’s score was set an average. Norway’s result was 7.54, which was clearly the highest of all countries, where the Central African Republic’s was only 2.69.

Source: BBC

Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Pin on Pinterest0Tweet about this on TwitterBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Deputy editor at Man Wants and real ale drinker. Only Malcolm can tell him what to do.


You may be interested in: